Our History

GETBNA

Our History

The Greater East Texas Black Nurse Association [GETBNA]was incorporated in 1991 by 12 Registered Nurses who set out to establish a local minority nurse chapter to support the international initiatives of minority disparity in healthcare. The National Black Nurse Association [NBNA] was organized in 1971 with a current membership of over 150,000 nurses.

The overall mission is to “provide a forum for collective action by nurses to investigate, define and advocate for the health care needs of African Americans and other ethnic groups to implement strategies that ensure access to health care equal to, or above health care standards of the larger society”. Throughout the year, we have offered and participated in mentoring, tutoring, public health volunteerism, as well as volunteered nursing service hours to Bethesda Clinic, and numerous local health fairs.

As licensed nurses in the East Texas Area, the provision of scholarship continues to be one of our top priorities. Annually, we solicit the necessary funding to support the scholarship program. The scholarships are awarded to young men and women who are committed to the rigorous educational and clinical course requirements in their accredited schools of nursing, and who have demonstrated commitment towards a higher level of integrity for the profession of nursing.  

We are most thankful to individuals and business partners who invest in the future of healthcare providers who support this initiative. We are a 501c3 organization which makes all donations tax deductible.

About Us

Our Mission

The National Black Nurses Association’s mission is to provide a forum for collective action by nurses to investigate, define and advocate for health care needs of African Americans and other ethnic groups to implement strategies that ensure access to health care, equal to or above health care standards of the larger society. NBNA is committed to improving the quality of life of persons who share the African American heritage and other ethnic groups by:

  • Building consumer knowledge and understanding of health care issues
  • Educating and mentoring registered nurses, licensed vocation/practical nurses, nursing students and retired nurses
  • Facilitating the professional development and career
  • Advancement of nurses in emerging healthcare systems
  • One on one mentoring of minority nursing students
  • Scholarship awards

 

GETBNA members are leaders in the community focused in the delivery of health promotion, disease prevention programs and public health education initiatives.

GETBNA

Our Mission

The National Black Nurses Association’s mission is to provide a forum for collective action by nurses to investigate, define and advocate for health care needs of African Americans and other ethnic groups to implement strategies that ensure access to health care, equal to or above health care standards of the larger society. NBNA is committed to improving the quality of life of persons who share the African American heritage and other ethnic groups by:

  • Building consumer knowledge and understanding of health care issues
  • Educating and mentoring registered nurses, licensed vocation/practical nurses, nursing students and retired nurses
  • Facilitating the professional development and career
  • Advancement of nurses in emerging healthcare systems
  • One on one mentoring of minority nursing students
  • Scholarship awards

 

GETBNA members are leaders in the community focused in the delivery of health promotion, disease prevention programs and public health education initiatives.

by Charles E. Coleman III

More Than Comforters Indeed

We are queens; We are kings; We’ve worked in factories. We’ve picked peas on the farm. We have been school teachers. We have been cooks.
“Child, I was there when you were born!”

We have doctored the sick in times of war and stitched bullet wounds in times of peace. We are mothers. We are fathers. “I am an aunt.” “I am a niece.”

We are husbands. We are wives. We are young ladies. We are young men. We are single parents, who, in spite of the odds against us, never gave in.

We are in every church. We guarantee, behind every good doctor, there is a very good nurse. We are strong hands that uplift. We are the strong voices of unity. We are the ties that bind family. We are the cornerstones of the community. We are the missionaries. We are the prayer warriors. We are there in every time of need.

WE, the black nurse of the world, are more than comforters, indeed!